Liverpool Slavery History Trail - A fascinating walk back in time.
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Eric Lynch is a black scouser, an active trade unionist though now retired from the council. He left school at the age of 14 and couldn't read and write because in those days it was judged that blacks didn't need such skills.
 
If you don't know where you come from you can't know where you are going to. This aphorism pertinent to individuals, is also relevant to cities. Without knowing about the past we will not be able to shape the future and those who are ignorant of their past remain in a fog of misunderstanding.
 
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Bookings:
Liverpool Slavery History Trail
t: 0151 709 7682
e: eric@slaveryhistorytours.com


Liverpool Capital of Culture

 
So it is fitting that someone who has moved around the city, explored it's history and worked in bastions of white employment should now be our guide for the city and its connections with slavery. In a way it shows that despite everything, the barriers of racism were always there to be broken down and Eric, with his imposing stature, confidently moving between the communities and explaining their histories, seems to be a natural ambassador.
 
Eric with a tour Group Opposite 'Albion House' also known as the 'White Star Line' Building.

 

About the Liverpool Slavery History Trail

The Liverpool Slavery History Trail is a fascinating walk back in time.


He wanted to research and record the true history of the port, in particular the part its merchants, officials and others had played in African enslavement, and the transatlantic crossings. His enthusiasm to leave the city even led him to unsuccessfully stow away on a ship bound for Barbados, but unfortunately, discovered just before the sailing, he was unceremoniously returned to the Liverpool shore. And so Eric stayed and learnt about Liverpool life and its history.


Slavery, racism and Liverpool are inextricably linked. The past record does not shine favourably on the city. Racist practices are still manifestly evident. The city's black population is largely confined to a ghetto area in the South of the city, known by most as Toxteth. Centuries of racial discrimination and prejudice are deeply ingrained. Eric describes during the Trail, how the system has sown discrimination, using divisions between newly arrived Irish and native Liverpudlians and then later, racism against non-white people, to divide people in the city.

So it is fitting that someone who has moved around the city, explored its history and worked in bastions of white employment should now be our guide for the city and its connections with slavery. In a way it shows that despite everything, the barriers of racism were always there to be broken down and Eric, with his imposing stature, confidently moving between the communities and explaining their histories, seems to be a natural ambassador.

If you don't know where you come from you can't know where you are going to. This aphorism pertinent to individuals, is also relevant to cities. Without knowing about the past we will not be able to shape the future and those who are ignorant of their past remain in a fog of misunderstanding.

As Eric says: “If you don't know where you come from, you can't know where you are going to. This aphorism, pertinent to individuals, is also relevant to cities. Without knowing about the past we will not be able to shape the future and those who are ignorant of their past remain in a fog of misunderstanding.”

In his company you will be taken on a journey of discovery, rivalling that of Dr Who's Tardis. From the 17th century you will be carried along over three hundred years, from Liverpool, a sleepy fishing village, to the coasts of Africa, the Caribbean, South America and the United States of America. You will mix with the lowest and the highest of classes. In their company you will marvel at the disparities of wealth. You will rub shoulders with those who are considered to be the great and good of this country. But above all you will gain an insight into how the wealth of Liverpool and the great empires was assembled. In short you will view history through the eyes of the oppressed - the slaves.

In his company you will be taken on a 300 year journey of discovery. From the Liverpool of the 17th century - a sleepy fishing village - to the coasts of Africa, the islands of the Caribbean, to South America and the United States. You will mix with all walks of society and in their company you will marvel at the disparities of wealth. You will rub shoulders with those who are considered to be ‘the great and good' of this country, and thereby learn more of the true history of the city.

But above all you will gain an insight into how the wealth of Liverpool was accrued and the great empires were made. In short you will view history through the eyes of the oppressed - the slaves.


The Liverpool Slavery History Trail is a fascinating walk back in time and your tour guide is Eric Scott Lynch, Liverpool Historian. Tours are available throughout the year and for more information please call 0151 709 7682 or contact Eric by completing the enquiry form by clicking here.

 

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Liverpool Slavery History Trail by Eric Scott Lynch | Copyright © 2010 email: eric@slaveryhistorytours.com | website Design by BDIMedia | sitemap

The Slavery History Trail - A Fascinating Walk Back In Time