Liverpool Slavery History Trail - A fascinating walk back in time.
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Eric Lynch - Liverpool Slavery History Trail
 

Eric Scott Lynch is a Liverpool born black man, an active trade unionist, retired Senior Shop Steward and Liverpool City Council Trainer.

He left school at the age of 14 unable to read or write, having been ‘educated' in city schools which regarded such skills as unnecessary for black children (and, it follows, black adults). Within a few years however, he had taught himself literacy skills, partly because of his interest in the recorded, (though often misinformed and incomplete), history of Liverpool.
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The geography of the British Isles, unlike that of the United States, doesn't at first sight appear to yield any clues to the country's slave trading past. There are no plantations, no plantation houses and seemingly little to suggest any connection between this country and the transatlantic trade in human lives.

Slavery appears as something that happened a long time ago and very far away: out of sight and out of mind. But a closer look at the built environment reveals that links to the slave trade are not only much closer than we realise, but also more numerous.

 

Bookings:
Liverpool Slavery History Trail
t: 0151 709 7682
e: eric@slaveryhistorytours.com


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Welcome to the Liverpool Slavery History Trail

The Liverpool Slavery History Trail is a fascinating walk back in time.



For what began as a small fishing hamlet on the River Mersey in 1207, Liverpool soon flourished as more and more British ships set sail to explore the oceans of the world. Well placed geographically for Atlantic trading, it played a pivotal role in the slave trade from 1730 onwards where many Liverpool-based businessmen prospered.

For what began as a small fishing hamlet on the River Mersey in 1207, Liverpool soon flourished as more and more British ships set sail to explore the oceans of the world. Well placed geographically for Atlantic trading, it played a pivotal role in the slave trade from 1730 onwards where many Liverpool-based businessmen prospered.

Textiles and ammunition would be exchanged in West Africa for humans who would then be taken to the Caribbean to work as slaves, with cotton coming back in to Liverpool - known as the triangular trade.

In the latter part of the eighteenth century, three quarters of all European slave ships left Liverpool. Liverpool traders, alone, shipped a total of one and half million black Africans across the Atlantic to the Caribbean. So, its not surprising that many of Liverpool's buildings were built with profits from the slave trade - the evidence of which is still visible, if you look close enough. For over 30 years, Eric Lynch has been doing just that, taking Liverpool visitors on a tour of some of the faces, cotton-plants and whips embedded in Liverpool's oldest buildings.

Nick Crane from the Popular BBC 'Coast' Programme Interviewing Eric while on the Liverpool Famous 'Slavery History Trail.
Nick Crane from the Popular BBC 'Coast' Programme Interviewing Eric while on the Liverpool Famous 'Slavery History Trail'.

The Liverpool Slavery History Trail is a fascinating walk back in time and your tour guide is Eric Scott Lynch, Liverpool Historian. Tours are available throughout the year and for more information please call 0151 709 7682 or contact Eric by completing the enquiry form by clicking here.

 
Liverpool Slavery History Trail by Eric Scott Lynch | Copyright © 2010 email: eric@slaveryhistorytours.com | website Design by BDIMedia | sitemap

The Liverpool Slavery History Trail - A Fascinating Walk Back In Time